GPEDC HLM2 Plenary - Moving Forward: How Effective Development Can Deliver the 2030 Agenda

The ambitious and universal 2030 Agenda calls for an equally ambitious and comprehensive response from all development actors. It will require strong political leadership, a revitalized Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation and increased efforts by all development actors to improve the quality, effectiveness, and impact of their cooperation. This plenary session highlighted the importance of effective development cooperation to delivering the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGS SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. ), with focus on SDG8 (Decent Work), SDG16 (peaceful and inclusive societies, access to justice and effective institutions) and SDG 10 (reducing inequalities).

Marita González, CGT Argentina

In her intervention, Ms González, from the Argentinian General Confederation of Workers (CGT Argentina), explained that the 2030 Agenda is a trade union priority, particularly to leave no one behind, and achieve an enabling environment allowing for freedom of association and collective bargaining, thus to more inclusive development. Ms González explained how social dialogue is a means of implementation of the 2030 Agenda, as shown is trade union case studies in Indonesia, Ghana and Uruguay.

Ms González said that inequality affects all the planet, also donor countries. Development cooperation should help in reducing these inequalities through an agenda based on transparency and accountability, which fights tax havens, tax evasion and tax dodging. Particularly when, as in the case of Latin America, illicit financial flows are much higher than ODA, as shown by ECLAC data (2016).

The four pillars of decent work (employment creation, workers’ rights, social protection and social dialogue) are key to leaving no one behind, and are cornerstones of the development effectiveness agenda, Ms González added. Most particularly, social dialogue has proven to be a useful tool to stabilise post-conflict and transition countries, as it empowers and brings together social partners to contribute to governance and socioeconomic issues, be it in Tunisia, South Africa or Indonesia. González also promoted the Global Partnership Initiative on Social Dialogue in Development, launched at the GPEDC HLM2.

Giovanni di Cola, Special Advisor for Field Operations and Partnerships to the ILO Deputy Director-General

Asserted the value of decent work for the implementation of the 2030 Agenda and outlined the four pillars of the Decent Work Agenda, which can also contribute to the advancement of the development effectiveness agenda. He stressed the importance of workers’ organizations, not only the achievement of SDG8 but also to those SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. linked to climate and just transition.

Ángel Gurría, Secretary General, OECD

Shared the worry of inequality and its impact on sustainable development, and described how inequality harms growth. That is why, he added, growth and equality should be seen as mutually beneficial. Mr Gurría shared his enthusiasm in initiatives such as the Global Deal for Decent Work and Inclusive Growth, by Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven. He added the OECD favours the dialogue between employers, trade unions and governments. The OECD also works for responsible business conduct, and the OECD Guidelines have helped to combat corruption, enact due diligence and enhance conditions in the garment sector. A lot of work needs to be done regarding the world of work, he added. Mr Gurría pointed out that SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. are universal, applying to donors and receivers alike. He also praised the GPEDC as a unique alliance, and one of the single most effective vehicles to achieve the SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. .

Amb. Claver Gatete, Rwandan Minister of Finance , shared how Rwanda has reduced poverty and inequalities in the last decade, thanks to inclusive development. He stressed that national development priorities need to be anchored in the SDGs.

Phyllis Wakiaga, CEO of the Kenya Association of Manufacturers stressed the need to create decent jobs.

Christiaan Rebergen, Director for International Cooperation, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Netherlands, spoke Dutch sectoral agreements with Dutch textile companies, NGOs and trade unions, for a responsible and sustainable value chain.