Trade union input to the upcoming EU Global Strategy on Foreign and Security Policy

In late June 2016, the European Union’s High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy and Commission’s Vice-President Federica Mogherini, will unveil the EU Global Strategy on Foreign and Security Policy (EU Global Strategy). Trade unions believe that development policy should be an essential part of the EU Global Strategy.

Read the full trade union input.

In late June 2016, the European Union’s High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy and Commission’s Vice-President Federica Mogherini, will unveil the EU Global Strategy on Foreign and Security Policy (EU Global Strategy). This document is set to address the challenges of EU foreign policy in a more connected, contested and complex world, and could mark an opportunity to recalibrate the different tools of the EU’s external action in a more coherent and efficient manner.

Trade unions believe that development policy should be an essential part of the EU Global Strategy. Development is not possible without security, and security is not possible without development. The EU Global Strategy should avoid a pure security and defence approach, but rather pursue a holistic approach in relations between EU and partner countries and regions. In this sense, social partners and civil society must be seen as fundamental actors to guarantee more resilient and sustainable societies.

The EU Global Strategy should contribute to the realisation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, pioneering the implementation of all 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. ). Trade unions are particularly committed to realising goals and targets to end poverty, foster decent work, ensure quality education, provide public services, infrastructure and social protection policies, reduce inequalities, champion women’s participation in the work force and improve fiscal, wage and social protection policies, ensure a just transition with green jobs as a way to mitigate climate change and address root causes of migration while promoting free movement areas.

Therefore, trade unions are a natural partner of the EU in advancing the SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. implementation and follow-up in partner countries and in international fora. The universality of the 2030 Agenda should also be reflected in the external action of the EU, which should lead by example and mainstream the SDGs SDGs The Sustainable Development Goals were one of the outcomes of the Rio+20 Conference. The members States launched a new set of future international development goals, which will build upon the Millennium Development Goals and converge with the post-2015 development agenda. in all policies, including development cooperation, trade, migration and human rights.

Read the full trade union input: EN, FR, ES

The document can also be found on the website of the European External Action Service (EEAS).