The relevance of social dialogue in development - New TUDCN/CPDE studies

In the framework of its work-stream on the relevance of social dialogue for development, the TUDCN has undertaken three national case studies in Ghana, Indonesia and Uruguay. This publication, made possible by the support of the CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness, shows that social dialogue makes an important contribution to some of the principles that are at the heart of the development effectiveness agenda.

Social dialogue within the countries is analysed in its various forms, with particular focus on the formalisation of these dialogues at different administrative levels and its contribution to development. The studies are authored by national trade union specialists and include examples of good practice as well as of limitations of the different contexts. Conclusions and recommendations based on the analysis are also outlined. The studies are funded by the CSO Partnership for Development Effectiveness.

Available in English, French and Spanish, this publication provides an evidence-based analysis of the contribution of social dialogue to sustainable in three countries: Uruguay, Ghana and Indonesia. Social dialogue is a form of multi-stakeholder dialogue which brings together the social partners, i.e. representatives of employers, workers and often of governments too. The evidence presented shows that social dialogue makes an important contribution to some of the principles that are at the heart of the development effectiveness agenda, namely those of ownership, inclusive partnerships and transparency and accountability.

The case studies indicate that putting forward policies that are the fruit of consensus among representative organisations ensures greater ownership. The processes of negotiation, consultation and information sharing with the social partners and their participation in institutions that implement negotiated policies, are deemed an important factor for the promotion of transparency and accountability. Including social partners in institutionalised dialogue is shown to contribute to inclusive partnerships.

Evidence further highlights that social dialogue acts as an additional safeguard for the respect of basic freedoms and contributes to governance. The broad consensus that it helps to achieve is also shown to strengthen institutional stability.

The full publication, which includes all three studies as well as executive summaries of each of them, is available for download: Social Dialogue for Sustainable Development in Uruguay, Ghana and Indonesia

The individual country studies are available here: